Forstschutz Aktuell Nr. 63 - Abstracts


Forest health situation 2012 in Austria: no drastic damage

Gottfried Steyrer, Thomas L. Cech, Alfred Fürst, Gernot Hoch, Ute Hoyer-Tomiczek, Hannes Krehan, Bernhard Perny

In 2012, the forest protection situation in Austria’s forests remained calm. Some interesting developments were observed but no exceptional calamities were recorded. The damage caused by snow, avalanches and storm increased compared to 2011 and reached a total of 1.2 million m³; the damaged timber could be processed in due time. The decline in bark beetle damage that has been observed since 2010 continued; several factors contributed to a further reduction of damaged volume to 50 % (0.9 million m³). Leaf feeding caterpillars, particularly winter moth species and oak processionary moth appear to be in the initial phase of an outbreak. Interestingly, a reduction of area affected by ash dieback has been recorded in 2012. It remains unclear whether this is actually due to better condition of some infested trees or rather to the removal of heavily affected individuals or stands.


Forest health situation 2013 in Austria: increasing but not extraordinary level of damage

Gottfried Steyrer, Thomas L. Cech, Alfred Fürst, Gernot Hoch, Ute Hoyer-Tomiczek, Hannes Krehan, Bernhard Perny

In 2013, a large variety of damaging factors was recorded in Austrian forests; none of the factors caused extraordinary levels of damage. Storm and snow damaged markedly more wood – in total 1.8 million m³ - than in 2012. However, this amount was clearly lower than after the catastrophic events in 2002, 2007 and 2008. Damage by bark beetles increased by 20 % to 1.05 million m³ after three years of decreasing levels. The expected outbreak of winter moth species took place following the noticed rise of populations in 2012. The cool and moist weather in spring favoured the occurrence of fungi infecting needles and leaves as well as dieback diseases in some regions. A new outbreak of the Asian longhorned beetle was detected; immediate and intensive eradication measures were taken.


Forest health situation 2014 in Austria: damage by hard rime and snow

Gottfried Steyrer, Thomas L. Cech, Alfred Fürst, Gernot Hoch, Ute Hoyer-Tomiczek, Hannes Krehan, Bernhard Perny

In 2014, biotic factors were the most important damaging factors in Austrian forests. Snow and hard rime damaged more than 2 million m³. Almost 1 million m³ was damaged by storm. Although substantial, this amount was clearly lower than in the years of catastrophic storms in the previous decade. Attacks by bark beetles further decreased; a total damage of 750 000 m³ approached the level before the start of the last outbreak in 2003. Defoliators such as winter moth species or Rhynchaenus fagi were of local importance. The crowns of larch were attacked by a variety of defoliating and sucking insects. Intensive eradication measures were taken against the outbreak of the Asian longhorned beetle that was discovered in fall 2013. Ash dieback is wide spread in Austria.


Forest health situation 2015 in Austria: summer drought abd bark beetle calamity

Gottfried Steyrer, Thomas L. Cech, Alfred Fürst, Gernot Hoch, Ute Hoyer-Tomiczek, Hannes Krehan, Bernhard Perny

High temperature and precipitation deficit determined the forest health situation in 2015. Particularly the North and East of Austria suffered from extreme drought during summer. This climatic situation triggered a massive increase in damage by bark beetle species to 2.42 million m³. The share of attacks by Pityogenes chalcographus was remarkably high. Bark beetle attacks became apparent by the end of the dry summer and received high public awareness. Storms damaged 1.8 million m³ of wood. Also supported by climatic conditions, the impact of Diplodia dieback on Pinus nigra increased.


Documentation of Forest damage Factors 2012-2015

Gottfried Steyrer, Heimo Schaffer, Wilhelm Nagy, Wilhelm Krenmayer

The Documentation of Forest Damage Factors (DWF) provides comprehensive yearly records of the important pests, diseases and abiotic damaging agents in all private and public forests of Austria. Records are based on estimates for each unit provided by foresters of the district forest authorities. The estimates consider the physiological damage to the tree rather than an economic damage. Parameters representing the volume of damaged trees and/or the damaged area are recorded for 72 damaging agents. Reporting and analysis of the damage is done on the level of district forest authorities; maps illustrate the volume and/or area damaged by each agent as well as the intensity of the damage and the change compared to the previous year.


Bundesforschungs- und Ausbildungszentrum für Wald, Naturgefahren und Landschaft (BFW)
Austria, 1131 Wien, Seckendorff-Gudent-Weg 8 | Tel.: +43 1 878 38-0

Publiziert: 14.05.2019
Autor: Steyrer G.

Bundesforschungs- und Ausbildungszentrum für Wald, Naturgefahren und Landschaft (BFW)
Austria, 1131 Wien, Seckendorff-Gudent-Weg 8 | Tel.: +43 1 878 38-0

Autor: Steyrer G.

Quelle/URL: https://bfw.ac.at/rz/bfwcms.web?dok=9903